Wildlife parks in the 21st Century have a duty to work for the conservation of biodiversity. Here at WMSP, we take this very seriously and contribute to this cause in a number of ways.

Find out more about our Research & Conservation efforts…

 “To facilitate and initiate research that contributes to species conservation and the welfare of animals in our care.”

Wildlife parks and zoos have an obligation to support and encourage research which will improve the welfare of captive animals. In addition, research at captive animal collections can generate knowledge on topics such as animal behaviour, physiology and reproduction. This knowledge can ultimately be used to assist species conservation.

West Midland Safari Park carries out research projects from an annually revised internal priority projects list. We also collaborate on projects initiated by external researchers from endangered species breeding programmes, other zoological parks, national and international conservation bodies and universities.

If you have an enquiry regarding conducting research at WMSP, or would like further details about projects we have completed/are undertaking, please contact the Research and Conservation Officer: research@wmsp.co.uk 

West Midland Safari Park carries out research projects from an annually revised internal priority projects list. We also collaborate on projects initiated by external researchers from endangered species breeding programmes, other zoological parks, national and international conservation bodies and universities.

If you have an enquiry regarding conducting research at WMSP, or would like further details about projects we have completed/are undertaking, please contact the Research and Conservation officer: research@wmsp.co.uk 

Supporting ‘in the field’ conservation

Supporting conservation, on the ground in the areas where our animals live in the wild, is a crucial part of our work.

Direct Funding of ‘in the field’ conservation

WMSP seeks to give funding to, and raise awareness for, some key wildlife conservation projects. We have long term relationships with the following conservation organisations:

 

  • WildCats Conservation Alliance – We support its work for the Kerinci Seblat Tiger Protection Project to safeguard the Sumatran tiger.

More information: www.conservewildcats.org/portfolio/kerinci-seblat-sumatran-tiger-protection-project/

 

  • Save the Rhino International – We have, for several years, supported SRI’s work with the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary and Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia.

More information: www.savetherhino.org/programmes/save-the-rhino-trust/

www.savetherhino.org/programmes/the-sumatran-rhino-sanctuary

 

  • AEECL (Lemur Conservation Association) – They work to protect 112 types of lemur who live only on the island of Madagascar.

More information: www.aeecl.org 

 

  • TUSK – We work with TUSK to support the Mali Elephant Project.

More information: www.tusk.org/projects/mali-elephant-project/

 

  • Global Penguin Society – They are committed to the protection of all 18 species of penguin.

More information: www.globalpenguinsociety.org/ 

Ex-situ conservation (conservation breeding)

Many species held in captivity are threatened in the wild. These and even some of those that are not yet classified as in trouble, are supported by well-managed captive breeding programmes. 

Ex-situ Conservation (conservation breeding)

 

Many species held in captivity are threatened in the wild. These and even some of those that are not yet classified as in trouble, are supported by well-managed captive breeding programmes.

 

Having centrally-managed programmes means animals are swapped between animal collections for breeding purposes, ensuring captive populations are as genetically diverse as possible, therefore acting as useful back-ups to the wild population of their species. WMSP takes part in over 25 managed breeding programmes.

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SSI Landscape 01

Habitat restoration

Part of the Devil’s Spittleful – a site of special scientific interest (SSSI) – falls within the WMSP boundary. 

Habitat Restoration

 

Part of the Devil’s Spittleful – a site of special scientific interest (SSSI) – falls within the WMSP boundary.

 

We take our responsibility to look after this land, which is lowland heathland habitat, very seriously.

 

Lowland heathland is a habitat which has reduced greatly over the past hundred years. It requires protection and conservation management to preserve it. The SSSI forms the core of the work WMSP does for native British wildlife.

 “It is up to us to protect the Earth.”

Like any responsible business, WMSP seeks to increase the sustainability of its business practices by minimising waste production, recycling where possible and using resources, such as water and electricity, efficiently.

Businesses and individuals all have a responsibility to use the planet’s resources responsibly. Wildlife parks work for the conservation of the species they hold and therefore businesses like WMSP have an extra reason for trying to be ‘green.’

We have a duty of care for the environment because you cannot conserve species without making sure their habitats are also protected from harm. 

US – To view our ‘green’ achievements so far, or our sustainability policy, please contact research@wmsp.co.uk 

YOU – We have produced a visitors’ charter (below) to help our guests and those considering visiting to ‘be green.’ 

Conserve Energy

 

If you come to WMSP in a vehicle, turn off the engine as soon as you have stopped in the car park. Idling engines use up fuel which will cost you and the environment.

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Carbon Balance Your Visit

 

Our Safari is a four-mile drive around in your car or coach, which we know produces greenhouse gases. Healthy forests soak up carbon dioxide. We take part in a scheme with the World Land Trust to ‘Carbon Balance’ the emissions produced by supporting their work to save forest. You can contribute by donating at the big money box in front of our Lorikeet Landing exhibit.

Find out more: www.worldlandtrust.org/what-we-do/carbon-balanced/

 

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Minimise waste 

 

All the waste that goes into our bins is sorted at the waste disposal site we use so that as much as possible can be diverted from landfill.  It is great if our visitors can help us reduce waste, for example by bringing picnics which do not have lots of overly packaged items.

 

Don’t Waste Water

 

All the taps in our toilets are push button or sensor taps – so they turn themselves off.  Therefore, we are helping you to help us save water!

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Respect Nature

 

Remember the animals you have seen at the Park. In the wild, they all rely on healthy ecosystems to survive. If you try to conserve energy and recycle in your daily life, you are helping preserve the environment.

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Support Green Tourism Businesses

There are hundreds of business trying to reduce their environmental impacts through the Green Tourism Business Scheme. WMSP has joined this scheme – read more here.

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Every year, we run six annual campaigns to help conservation organisations which protect the wild relatives of the species we hold at the Park.

We hold events at the Safari Park and members of staff from many departments set themselves challenges and gain additional funds through sponsorship!

In 2016 we raised £14,000 with our annual conservation projects campaigns. 

In 2017 we raised over £16,000 with our annual conservation projects campaigns. 

In 2018 we raised over £14,000 with our annual conservation projects campaigns.

To find which conservation charities benefited please contact our conservation office: research@wmsp.co.uk.

Giraffe Week

(26th May – 3rd June)

Giraffe Week Week (26th May – 3rd June)

 

Raising money for the Giraffe Conservation Foundation.

Funds will go directly to the Nubian giraffe conservation programme in Uganda.  The Nubian giraffe is one of the most endangered types of giraffe.

Bumblebee Week

(28th July – 3rd August)

Bumblebee Week (28th July – 3rd August)

 

Raising money for the Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Funds will go assisting the trust conserve bumblebees and their habitats in the UK.  

In the last 80 years, bumblebee populations have crashed. Two species have become nationally extinct and several others have dramatically declined in numbers.

Tiger Week

(4th – 10th August)

Tiger Week (4th – 10th August)

 

Raising money for the Wildcats Conservation Alliance. Funds will go towards the protect of Sumatran tigers in the Kerinci Seblat National Park in Indonesia. 

There are estimated to be only 350-400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild.

Penguin Week

(11th – 17th August)

Penguin Week (11th – 17th August)

 

Raising money for the Global Penguin Society. There are 18 species of penguin and 10 of them are threatened in the wild.

The society runs many projects and aims to protect all species of penguin.

Grèvy’s Zebra Week

(18th – 24th August)

Grèvy’s Zebra Week (18th – 24th August)

 

Raising money for the Grèvy’s Zebra Trust. 

Grèvy’s zebra could go extinct because its habitat and sources of food and water are under threat. The Grèvy’s Zebra Trust conserves the endangered Grèvy’s zebra and its fragile habitat in partnership with local communities in the Grèvy’s native countries of Ethiopia and Kenya. 

Elephant Week

(25th August – 2nd September)

Elephant Week (25th August – 2nd September)

 

Raising money for the Mali Elephant Project. 

This project works to protect one of the last of just two remaining desert elephant herds in the world.